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Yucatan

Do you have a Yucatecan friend? Those are some differences between a normal friend and the Yucatecan.

A normal friend greets you with a smile and a handshake when you find in the Street. A Yucatecan friend greets you with a big hug and instead of “Hello”, he says “When we go for two?”   View this post on Instagram #CervezaPatito #Universitarios A post shared by Rodolfo A. Rivera (@rodolforivera97) on Nov…

El Cuyo, Yucatan

A paradise in Yucatan, called El Cuyo. You must visit this place.   Pure – white sand welcomes you to this paradise that the modern world skipped. View this post on Instagram Impresionante atardecer en El Cuyo, Yucatán • • • La fotografía es de @kaary_kd Te invitamos a que visites su galería • •…

Progreso, Yucatan: Sun, Beach and Fun

Merida residents flock to the port city of Progreso to stroll along the malecón (waterfront promenade) and take a dip in the emerald green waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Progreso’s lovely waterfront promenade is always bustling with food and craft vendors, local residents and beach-goers, and the waters just off the coast are calm,…

Valladolid, The Sultan of the East

  Located mid-way between Mérida and Cancun, colonial Valladolid is the third-largest city in Yucatan and a good base from which to explore the surrounding region. Visit Mayan ruins at Chichen Itza and Ek’ Balam, the Balankanche caves and Rio Lagartos, a coastal fishing village and flamingo colony located within the Reserva de la Biosfera…

Traditional Celebrations in Yucatan

Vaquerias are traditional feasts and celebrations of music and dance unique to Yucatán. The traditional Vaqueria Feast is influenced by the traditions of the both the indigenous Maya and the Spanish and is usually held in honor of the patron saint of a village or hacienda (plantation). The fiesta typically lasts for several days and…

Yucatan’s Green Gold

The haciendas henequeneras (henequen plantations) in the state of Yucatan first emerged in the 17th century as family-owned cattle ranches, farming and manufacturing centers that produced products for export, before later converting to henequen production. View this post on Instagram #henequen 🇲🇽 A post shared by 𝙍𝙖𝙪𝙡 𝙁𝙞𝙚𝙧𝙧𝙤 (@fierrox) on Apr 21, 2016 at 4:46pm…

San Servacio Church – Valladolid, Yucatan

It is located on the southern side of the main square and was built by Priest Francisco Hernandez on March 24, 1545. In 1705 it was demolished by appointment of Bishop Pedro de los Rios Reyes, after the desecration of such sacred building, in the so called “Crime of Mayors.” In 1706 it was restored…

House of Montejo

It was built between 1543 and 1549 by Francisco de Montejo y Leon “El Mozo” by appointment of his father, in order to provide a home for the Spanish conquerors. View this post on Instagram Casa de montejo 🗿#meridatudestino #turismo #venameridablanca #casademontejo A post shared by luz Mendoza (@mendozalucezita) on Aug 12, 2016 at 9:57am…

Merida Government Palace

This magnificent building had its precedent headquarters on the Royal Houses, colonial government place. It served both as office for administrative and government business, as well as bedrooms for the official representatives of the Crown. Once independence was consumed the place was called Government Palace, and in the late XIX century the old building was…

7 churches and former convents you must visit in Yucatan

Yucatan has a vast history of churches and former convents. We want to let you know about the seven you simply cannot miss. OXKUTZCAB: San Francisco de Asis Former Convent View this post on Instagram San Francisco de Asís, Oxkutzcab A post shared by Philip DePoala (@_philfree) on Apr 22, 2016 at 7:14pm PDT View…

6 Things to do in Yucatan this summer

1.- Visit the Archaeological site of Mayapán: Beyond the crowds at other major sites, magnificent Mayapán is often overlooked but is equally important historically. 30 minutes from Mérida. 2.- Go to the Choco-story chocolate museum: Across the entrance to Uxmal. Taste a natural cacao beverage, watch the live crafting of hand-made ceramics, experience a Mayan…

7 things you must know about Yucatan

Merida’s downtown is the second largest in Mexico. The first one is in Mexico City. The second language in Yucatan is the Mayan language. Yucatan has cenotes. You can’t get lost. All the streets have numbers. Even numbers from north to south and odd numbers from east to west. Yucatan has its own alcoholic beverage,…

Welcome to Yucatan

The beginnings and origin of who we are today were born in the land of the Mayas, the Mayan, with the ancient Maya civilization to which we belong and whose ancient heritage fills us with pride. Humanity in the 21st-century searches to reconnect with ourselves, to become reconciled with nature, and to learn from their…

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